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Question:

From Charleston, South Carolina, USA:

My 14 year old daughter, diagnosed at age 11, has never had great A1cs. Her last one was 11.3, which is outrageous, I know, but I can't seem to get through to her how serious this is. She omits insulin, eats whatever or whenever and couldn't really care less. I try to encourage her, talk with her, and help her plan meals, etc. She tests her friend's blood sugar to get good numbers. I find her packed lunches thrown away. Her last kidney test show that she is dripping protein, which her endocrinologist said means her kidneys are stressed and she may need an ACE inhibitor, but the damage would not be permanent if her A1c improves. In other words, the situation would correct itself if blood sugars improve. Is this true?

Answer:

This is a very common question and problem. You should review our previous questions on Behavior. Many times, you will see that we encourage the parent(s) to take over diabetes care until the child demonstrates that he/she is ready to resume the proper responsibility for his/her own care.

As for the kidneys, it certainly is related to control, but, sometimes, in spite of great control, the kidneys need treating. I would certainly try to improve the control. Please consult with your diabetes team about getting help from a counselor.

LD

DTQ-20060612165510
Original posting 25 Jun 2006
Posted to Complications and Behavior

  
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Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:10:08
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