advertisement
 

  Back to Ask the Diabetes Team Ask the Diabetes Team
Question:

From Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA:

My nine year old son had a GAD-65 screening in May 2005. We'd taken him to the endocrinologist after a few tests revealed numbers of 140 to 160 mg/dl [7.8 to 8.9 mmol/L] two hours after eating and a fasting of 111 mg/dl [6.2 mmol/L] one morning. The endocrinologist called and said the GAD-65 was elevated and there was "significant activity taking place." We were instructed to take occasional blood glucose tests and return for laboratory work when his numbers were over 200 mg/dl [11.1 mmol/L] two hours after eating, with symptoms. In addition to avoiding high carbohydrate foods, isn't there anything else I can do as a parent to delay the onset of type 1 diabetes other than wait for his pancreas to be destroyed to the point we can clinically diagnose type 1 diabetes? His four year old brother was diagnosed with type 1 in November 2004 and I'm having a hard time coming to grips with the prospect of both of our children being diabetics. Caring for two diabetic children is going to be difficult, but it's the anxiety of waiting for my older son to be "sick enough" to be diagnosed that's bothering me more than anything.

Answer:

There is not much that definitely works in preventing type 1 diabetes. Positive antibodies remain a marker for this future development and, as you said, cause a lot of angst with the waiting. Staying away from obviously high sugar foods is a common sense approach, but likely only a temporizer. There are some experimental protocols run under the auspices of the National Institute of Diabetes & Digestive & Kidney Diseases of the National Institute of Health and the Diabetes Prevention Trials, so you may want to discuss these with your endocrinologist. Not all parents and kids are wiling to participate in such experimental trials, but at least you could learn about the options.

SB

DTQ-20060718163411
Original posting 25 Jul 2006
Posted to Diagnosis and Symptoms

  
advertisement


                 
  Home Return to Top

Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:10:08
This Internet site provides information of a general nature and is designed for educational purposes only. If you have any concerns about your own health or the health of your child, you should always consult with a physician or other health care professional.

This site is published by T-1 Today, Inc. (d/b/a Children with Diabetes), a 501c3 not-for-profit organization, which is responsible for its contents.
By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Legal Notice, and Privacy Policy.
© Children with Diabetes, Inc. 1995-2015. Comments and Feedback.