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Question:

From Memphis, Tennessee, USA:

I asked a question previously about tests I had done. I got the results for the A1c and it was within the normal range, 5.8%. However, my fasting blood glucose has been between 111 mg/dl [6.2 mmol/L] and 120 mg/dl [6.7 mmol/L]. My doctor says I have nothing to worry about. Just after eating, my blood sugar shoots to over 170 mg/dl [9.4 mmol/L] and doesn't go below 120 mg/dl [6.7 mmol/L] for three to four hours. This doesn't seem right. I know glucose begins spilling over into the urine at around 160 to 180 mg/dl [8.9 to 10.0 mmol/L] and that can't be good for kidney function. Am I "developing" diabetes? There is a strong history of autoimmune diseases in my family. Should I follow my doctor's advice and not worry?

Answer:

Emotionally, your doctor can allay your fears about diabetes for the moment as you do not have diabetes. However, you appear to have impaired fasting glucose. This may be also termed impaired glucose tolerance, pre-diabetes, or may be part of a collection of findings termed the metabolic syndrome. The bottom line is that some people go on and progress to diabetes. This is especially true in families with a history of type 2 diabetes. It is less clear what it means in your situation with a family history of autoimmune disease as this progression described above is more likely to occur with type 2 diabetes and not type 1 diabetes (the autoimmune disease). In general, I would use these findings as a warning that says you need to make good lifestyle choices with regard to weight management and exercise.

JTL

DTQ-20061012201231
Original posting 18 Oct 2006
Posted to Diagnosis and Symptoms

  
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Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:10:10
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