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Question:

From Northern California, USA:

My mother-in-law is diabetic and my teenage daughter is insulin resistant.

My four year old son has been urinating a LOT. He goes many times in the day as well as at least one time each night, almost every single night, and the volume is high. He's always been thirsty so I just figured that what was coming in was coming out. Keeping the water from him so he doesn't get up at night isn't an option because he is thirsty.

What made me think that it might be concerning is that he's been seemingly starving. He is ALWAYS hungry. It's not a "normal" "I'm bored so I want to eat" or "I didn't get enough to eat and I'd like more...." It's an insatiable hunger. For example, a normal day would consist of two packs of instant oatmeal for breakfast along with a glass of milk. Then, a small snack, then lunch - a full sandwich (usually Nutella, peanut butter and jelly, or cheese) along with a bag of chips or crackers, a fruit snack and granola bar. Later, he has another snack (anything from crackers, fruit, veggies, dry fruit, etc.). He then eats a normal dinner, maybe chicken, hamburgers, spaghetti, tacos, etc. After dinner, he wants more and he'll take anything, carrots, apples, yogurt or even milk. It's like pain, the desire he has for food and water. It's not like he's just an overeater. I can't explain the intensity of his hunger.

My son is 47 inches tall and 57 pounds. I took him to the doctor because after another night of him begging for food, or milk or ANYTHING at 9:00 at night, I needed to find out what's going on. This can't be normal! The doctor wasn't impressed and told me to get some protein powder to add to his foods and to try low glycemic foods as well.

I did check his blood sugar two times. Once, fasting, he was 120 mg/dl [6.7 mmol/L] and the other time was two hours after eating and he was 128 mg/dl [7.1 mmol/L].

Today is the first time I've tried the protein and I saw no change. For breakfast, he ate a yogurt with protein powder and a glass of milk. Later, he had a snack consisting of grapes, a graham cracker, fish crackers and juice, pizza for lunch, an afternoon snack, dinner of a taco with a glass of protein milk, then two yogurts and an apple. I'm not sure what's going on or what to ask the doctor. He wasn't worried, but I am VERY worried. It just doesn't seem right. Maybe it's nothing, but I would so very much appreciate any input and/or insight you can give me.

Answer:

Your description is clear. I do not know if there is anything truly, worrisomely or metabolically "wrong" with your son, but the symptoms do warrant some investigation.

Certainly diabetes can present this way. Irregular signals to the appetite and thirst centers of the brain can do this. At a minimum, I think some screening tests should be done (e.g., general chemistries and thyroid levels in blood, maybe with a first morning urinalysis).

If your doctor is resistant to this, you might want a second opinion.

DS

DTQ-20061018232322
Original posting 24 Oct 2006
Posted to Diagnosis and Symptoms

  
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Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:10:10
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