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Question:

From Huntsville, Alabama, USA:

I have written you a few times about my 11 year old daughter. Her fasting blood sugars have been anywhere from 99 to 128 mg/dl [5.5 to 7.1 mmol/L]. She has only had two readings above 126 mg/dl [7.0 mmol/L]. Her after dinner blood sugars several weeks ago were all around 115 to 130 [6.4 to 7.2 mmol/L]. But, the past few weeks they have been 128 to 172 [7.1 to 9.6 mmol/L]. These reading are all two hours after dinner with a few being at three hours.

First of all, I would guess that the numbers are getting higher because the probable diabetes is progressing. I know these are not high enough for a diagnosis, but should I contact her endocrinologist? She has an appointment at the end of November. How long does it usually take for the diabetes to progress?

Also, I have checked myself and my husband on several occasions two hours after dinner and we have both been in the 80s mg/dl [4.4 to 4.9 mmol/L], so am I correct in guessing that at two hours, the blood sugar should return to a near fasting level? Also, it seems that on the nights I don't check my daughter until the three hour mark (usually because we forget), her readings are higher than on the nights I check her at two hours. Why would that be?

Answer:

I guess I would ask why are you doing all this testing. She doesn't have diabetes at present and it certainly isn't fun to have your finger pricked.

I would look for symptoms of diabetes and only test then. There is no data that we should treat pre-diabetes. If that is the case and I really cannot say what three months or three years would be like, she might not get diabetes.

LD

DTQ-20061023123706
Original posting 28 Oct 2006
Posted to Diagnosis and Symptoms

  
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Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:10:10
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