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Question:

From Cut Off, Louisiana, USA:

My five-year-old daughter has had increased thirst, increased appetite, increased urination (has been wetting the bed for almost two weeks and has had a couple of accidents during the day), and cravings of high carbohydrate foods (bread, cookies, rice, etc.). I began checking her sugars, both fasting and random (fasting between 99 mg/dl [5.5 mmol/L] to 169 mg/dl [9.4 mmol/L] and random between 105 mg/dl [5.8 mmol/L] to 266 mg/dl [14.8 mmol/L]). We took her to the doctor and she did blood work. My daughter's A1c was 5.1, C-Peptide was 1.0, and fasting blood sugar was 92 mg/dl [5.1 mmol/L]. All the other blood work was good. She is continuing to have symptoms and her blood sugars are erratic. Can this be the honeymoon period of type 1 or can this be type 2? Our doctor is leaning towards type 2, but everything I read says could be honeymoon of type 1. We are going to see a pediatric endocrinologist tomorrow, but I want to prepare myself mentally if this could be type 1. Please give me your honest opinion.

Answer:

I don't think you have enough data to tell the type. The endocrinologist can do other tests, antibodies, etc. to see if there is autoimmunity and type 1 risk. A fasting blood sugar of 92 mg/dl [5.1 mmol/L] is not diabetes. Finger prick glucoses are not used to diagnose diabetes unless the glucose is really high. I would continue to check some, but not multiple times a day unless told to do so. I worry more about the testing actually. If something is about to happen, it will unfold. Many times is isn't diabetes at all.

LD

DTQ-20070103162859
Original posting 12 Jan 2007
Posted to Diagnosis and Symptoms

  
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Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:10:10
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