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Question:

From Canada:

Is there any danger in letting things slowly unfold? My eight year old, who is slightly overweight, had symptoms and highs, 10 mmol/L [180 mg/dl] to 15 mmol/L [270 mg/dl], when mildly sick with a respiratory virus. He continues to be mildly elevated postprandially and/or at bedtimes (6.7 mmol/L [121 mg/dl] to 10.0 mmol/L [180 mg/dl]), but is relatively asymptomatic. Fasting blood work presumably came back normal, but we've had no word. I want to stop checking as I have been doing for two weeks, but wonder if it is in my son's best interest. I don't want to treat him as diabetic unnecessarily (diet, checks, etc.), but also don't want him to suffer complications because I am ignoring these warning signs and letting them have their effect on his body until his body no longer copes and declares itself with full-blown diabetes, if indeed it does. The pediatrician doesn't seem interested in any discussion without positive blood work, so I'm asking what direction is best for my child in these circumstances.

Answer:

I don't think your son is diabetic nor may be a risk for diabetic complications. That said, to rule out definitively the diagnosis of diabetes, a more complete diagnostic procedure should be carried out by a pediatric endocrinologist with experience in diabetes.

MS

DTQ-20070214130437
Original posting 16 Feb 2007
Posted to Diagnosis and Symptoms

  
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Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:10:12
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