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Question:

From Minneapolis,Minnesota, USA:

I am just wondering what is thought of my three hour glucose test results: 76 mg/dl [4.2 mmol/L], 198 mg/dl [10.9 mmol/L], 161 mg/dl [8.9 mmol/L], and 49 mg/dl [2.7 mmol/L]. My doctor wasn't concerned and said "technically" I failed the test, but she thinks I should just watch my diet and continue to exercise as I have been doing. She also knows that I do not usually eat a large amount of carbohydrates anyway. I did not eat a high carbohydrate diet three days before the test since the laboratory did not instruct me to do so.

Answer:

The three hour glucose tolerance test is definitely abnormal. If there was gestational diabetes in the past, this qualifies, by most experts, for a classification of having "pre-diabetes." In addition, the glucose tolerance test showing a two-hour blood glucose greater than 150 mg/dl [8.3 mmol/L] also places one in the category of pre-diabetes. The best information relating to the prevention of overt diabetes in people who have pre-diabetes comes from the Diabetes Prevention Program in which there was a 58% reduction in new onset diabetes in those who had lifestyle change including diet and an exercise program consisting of approximately 150 minutes of aerobic exercise weekly. The low blood glucose at three hours is suggestive of reactive hypoglycemia, which is also seen in people with an increased risk of diabetes. I agree with your physician that a diet low in carbohydrates associated with an exercise program approved by your physician are of benefit. If gestational diabetes is currently present, this is a different ball game altogether as relates to control of glucose.

ChR

DTQ-20070702153104
Original posting 9 Jul 2007
Posted to Diagnosis and Symptoms and Type 2

  
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Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:10:12
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