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From Brighton, Michigan, USA:

My son recently had his tonsils removed. He developed thrush after the surgery and complained of stomach pain off and on throughout the recovery, but, on day eight, it was severe. His pediatrician found no apparent cause. Later that day, the link between thrush and stomach pain and high blood sugar occurred to me and I tested his blood sugar level on a calibrated home machine after thoroughly washing and drying his hands. He had a frozen drink about 30 minutes prior to the first test with a reading of 231 mg/dl [12.8 mmol/L]. He did not eat after that and his blood sugar level 30 minutes later was 160 mg/dl [8.9 mmol/L]. An hour from the first reading, he was improving and his blood sugar level was 130 mg/dl [7.2 mmol/L]. Two hours from the first reading, and two and a half hours since eating, his pain returned (in his throat and stomach) and his reading was 197 mg/dl [10.9 mmol/L]. Four hours from his last consumption of anything other than pain medications, his blood sugar level was 141 mg/dl [7.8 mmol/L]. We are treating the thrush with nystatin. When the thrush clears up, will his blood sugars return to normal? Can all of these readings be explained by the stress on his body? I read once that a non-diabetic should never have a blood sugar over a certain level. Is this true? If so, what is that level? Finally, would you suggest any further monitoring, or is this just a temporary hyperglycemia due to physical stress?


A blood sugar of 231 mg/dl [12.8 mmol/L] is clearly abnormal. One cannot reliably make a diagnosis (or rule out a diagnosis) of diabetes based on home blood testing equipment. I would suggest visiting with your pediatrician for a complete history and physical examination -- as well as testing for diabetes.


Original posting 6 Aug 2007
Posted to Diagnosis and Symptoms and Hyperglycemia and DKA


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Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:10:12
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