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From Richland, Washington, USA:

When a diabetic experiences a rebound caused by a low blood sugar, what would you think the range of those rebound blood sugars could be? I know some go up in the 300s mg/dl [over 16.7 mmol/L], even higher. I am wondering if it is possible that even a 180 mg/dl [10.0 mmol/L] to 225 mg/dl [12.5 mmol/L] could be a rebound. Could how much insulin your body is still producing be a factor in the rebound blood sugar? Also, do you think a rebound happens ONLY when your child is experiencing a dangerous low or could it happen when the blood sugar is just dropping to fast?

There are times when my son eats like a growing teen and other times when he will eat hardly anything throughout the day. On days he eats hardly anything and has started off with a great blood sugar number and is high hours later, I am always questioning which one of those 100 causes might it be. I am wondering if it is possible that the body is picking up a quick drop, not necessarily a dangerous low, and causing a release of insulin which is acting like a rebound which is causing the body to be more resistant to the insulin by treating these highs in the day to follow. Is this possible?


It is hard to know. Maybe it could also be there isn't enough basal insulin and this is just a reflection of that. (I'm assuming there isn't a bolus with no food). The easiest way to know is to follow the glucose at frequent intervals and look for the lows. Children do rebound after a low...sometimes I wonder if it isn't also from the treatment.


Original posting 11 Apr 2008
Posted to Other and Hypoglycemia


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Last Updated: Tuesday April 06, 2010 15:10:16
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