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From Knoxville, Tennessee, USA:

My nine-year-old daughter was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at age 3. She has been living with her stepmom and dad for four years. She has behavioral problems, like cutting her little sister's hair, sneaking food, and sometimes doing things that she knows are not allowed. Recently, she got her ADHD medicine and was playing with it; she didn't take any though. When asked why she does these things, her response is "I don't know." How much of the bad behavior is related to diabetes and what part of it is something else? I know sneaking food is related to her diabetes, but I am not sure about the other behaviors.

As a result of her misbehavior, dad punishes her by not allowing her to come stay with me on the weekend. Do you agree with this form of punishment? I think it is counter-productive.


Your daughter’s behaviors are concerning, but they are unlikely to be related to diabetes. Children do struggle when they are aware of conflict between their parents, and/or if their forms of discipline are not consistent. My strong recommendation is that your daughter be seen by a specialist in child behavior (a psychologist or social worker (your pediatrician can help you find someone in your community) and that you and your ex-husband attend the meetings along with your daughter to get a better handle on how to help her behaviors.


Original posting 7 Feb 2012
Posted to Behavior


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Last Updated: Tuesday February 07, 2012 23:59:44
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