advertisement
 

  Back to Ask the Diabetes Team Ask the Diabetes Team
Question:

From Louisiana, USA:

My son was nine when diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. He has been well controlled since then, which was 16 months ago. Now, all of a sudden, he needs no insulin, I understand this is called the honeymoon period. Does it usually occur this long after being diagnosed? I am a nurse and I understand a lot of this except the fact that he doesn't require any insulin. I still give him seven units of Lantus because I was told not to eliminate all insulin. I do most of his adjustments myself with carbohydrate counting and Lantus since he was diagnosed. Is it common to go into the honeymoon after being diagnosed over a year ago?

Answer:

I am going to be surprised just like you. I sometimes see a long honeymoon in some patients. I suppose questions like "Did he have antibodies measured and did he have GAD antibodies?" might be a good question. Likewise, what is his true glucose pattern? I sometimes get a few days of continuous glucose monitoring to see the pattern after meals, etc. to prove to myself and parents that the glucose excursions after meals demonstrate all is not really "normal" again and there still is abnormal glucose handling, i.e., diabetes. If you can't get the CGM, then do the eight point tests done in research...before and after meals, bedtime and 2 a.m. This might show the pattern of glucose intolerance. In any case, the honeymoon is shortened by glucose stress, that is high sugars...so keep the insulin going.

LD

DTQ-20121026004357
Original posting 30 Oct 2012
Posted to Honeymoon

  
advertisement


                 
  Home Return to Top

Last Updated: Tuesday October 30, 2012 17:55:04
This Internet site provides information of a general nature and is designed for educational purposes only. If you have any concerns about your own health or the health of your child, you should always consult with a physician or other health care professional.

This site is published by T-1 Today, Inc. (d/b/a Children with Diabetes), a 501c3 not-for-profit organization, which is responsible for its contents.
By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Legal Notice, and Privacy Policy.
© Children with Diabetes, Inc. 1995-2015. Comments and Feedback.