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Question:

From Phoenix, Arizona, USA:

Our eight-year-old daughter, type 1 since August 2013, has a DexCom CGM (now with Share, which is great), which has been wonderful when tolerated, but we have been unable to take advantage of it regularly over the last six months because of a severe site reaction to the DexCom adhesive. Usually, within one to two days, the itching is unbearable and the sensor becomes dislodged, exposing a raised welt. We have tried all the usual work around suggestions including daily oral antihistamines, placing a barrier of tegaderm or IV3000, etc. as well as using skin prep/Cavilon skin barrier spray/Benadryl spray on the site beforehand, etc. Wen we tried a topical steroid, even the weakest hydrocortisone or Triamcinalone cream, it spiked her blood sugar to unnacceptable levels. We are vigilant about keeping her skin healthy and use eczema creams, etc., religously. The 3M silicone based Kind Removal tape works best on her skin for her pump site and tubing loops because it doesn't react at all with her skin, but the DexCom adhesive seems to penetrate the silicone tape because of its permeability. The non-adherent side of the silicone tape is difficult to adhere to as well. Has anyone had any success or is informed of any other strategies/ideas on how to work around the dexcom site allergy?

Answer:

Try using spray steroid inhaler (Rx) and Johnson & Johnson Tough Pads on clean dry skin. An adult blogger had a similar issue and has written about her DexCom Rash and has recently added this related post.

NB

DTQ-20150422195125
Original posting 5 May 2015
Posted to Continuous Sensing

  
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Last Updated: Tuesday May 05, 2015 20:18:47
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