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Poll Results

 

In light of growing world tensions, are you stockpiling additional diabetes supplies?

 
     

Yes, less than one month's worth

 
 

6%

 

  33

 
     

Yes, between one and three month's worth

 
 

24%

 

  127

 
     

Yes, between three and six month's worth

 
 

5%

 

  28

 
     

Yes, more than six month's worth

 
 

2%

 

  13

 
     

No, I'm not concerned

 
 

31%

 

  164

 
     

No, I can't afford it

 
 

12%

 

  64

 
     

I haven't decided yet

 
 

13%

 

  70

 
     

Other

 
 

2%

 

  14

 
 

In light of growing world tensions, are you stockpiling additional diabetes supplies?

Poll dates: March 9 - 16, 2003
Total Votes: 513

Management of diabetes requires an uninterrupted supply of insulin (or oral medications), pump supplies or syringes, blood glucose monitoring strips, lancets, and perhaps other supplies (alcohol wipes, glucose tablets, etc.). During periods of uncertainty, many people stock up on these supplies to ensure that a temporary disruption in deliveries won't impact their ability to manage their diabetes.

Readers sent in these comments about this poll:

  • I always try to keep pump supplies stockpiled-of course can't order until low! Did buy some "just in case" Lente insulin and extra syringes.

  • I decided to get my supplies by mail order. My insurance will pay for 90 days worth at a time. I thought this was a good idea given the recent events. It is so scary to think I wouldn't be able to get any if I needed them. I just have syringes, lancets, insulin, and test strips. (Utah, US)

  • I was attempting to stockpile, and send extra to school and daycare just in case. It is too expensive. It is very scary to even think that my child would not have all needed diabetic supplies wiht him wherever he happens to be just becasue I can't afford to stockpile.

  • I haven't really thought about stock piling my supplies in case of war. However, I always have between a one month and three month supply of my supplies, insulin etc. As soon as I get down to one month, I reorder. So I feel like I am in good shape.

  • We have 100 extra syringes, 5 extra penfill of Novolog, 1 extra bottle of Lantus, 100 extra pen needles, and 300 extra test strips.

  • I always try to have a stockpile of insulin and test strips. This is not because of concerns about a war with Iraq, but because of concerns about losing my job. I work in the high tech area and have several friends who have been out of work for more than 6 months. Given this, I consider a stockpile as a sensible precaution to that, if I were to lose my job, I wouldn't have the added problems of worrying about tests and insulin at least for a small while (3-6 months).

  • I usually have 3 months worth of supplies on hand. Now that war is threatening, I am extra careful to keep that supply at no less than three months.

  • We have about a months worth of strips on hand, at least a month of syringes/needles, and at least enough insulin for a month. Living in California I worry about earthquakes in addition to the threat of war. Our daughter was diagnosed right after 9/11, and our doctor advised us at diagnosis to keep at least 2 weeks worth of all supplies on hand at all times in the event of terrorist activity that might prohibit us from getting to a pharmacy--or prohibit the pharmacy from receiving their supplies.

  • Although my "stockpile" of diabetes supplies for my son is full, I don't think it has to do with impending war, so much as just having the extras there for everyday emergencies, etc.

  • We are stockpiling insulin pump supplies, ketostix, lancets. We have plenty of insulin in the fridge due to not always needing the spare bottle we get.

  • On the issue of stock-piling supplies, I would love to be able to get about 3 months worth but with insurance and co-pays, we are not able to "stock-pile" without paying for it ourselves. And that's almost impossible to do with two type I diabetics in our household. I really enjoy your entire website but go first to the polls. It sometimes brings me back to reality that we are not the only family with this disease.

  • I began stockpiling after Sept 11. I was just too scared of what could happen. Currently I have about 300 regular syringes (we only use these with Lantus now so we only need about 30 a month), 2 months of test strips, 4 glucometers and supplies (unintentional stockpiling -- our hospital recently gave us another glucometer and we got a one touch in the mail free a few months ago), 4 bottles of ketone strips, many cotton and alcohol pads, 2 months of Lantus and about 2 months of Humalog. And I keep a few of the "used" Lantus bottles. I figure these would be better than nothing if we can't get supplies. I hate feeling this way, but I am well aware of how diabetic children in most of the world's countries fare.

  • I always have one to three months of diabetes related supplies on hand but not necessarily because of the world situation.

  • I am stockpiling diabetes supplies, to the extent that I can afford (plus insurance maximum allowed). Even disregarding he present situation, extra supplies are good to have in case of an emergency. I have over a years worth of pump supplies (resevoirs, infusion sets, batteries, site dressings), extra syringes (4 months worth), insulin (4 months worth), and several 100 count bottles of ketostix. Extra blood test strips would be nice, but my insurance doesn't cover much in the first place, thus I can't afford it. Also, I have at least 5 emergency glucagon kits and fast acting, non-expirable for several years, glucose products on the standbye such as gel and tablets.

  • I get very nervous when I place a new 3 month mail order for my son who is eight years old. He has been living with diabetes for 5 years. When I only have 1 bottle of all of his insulin, I can't wait to get the new supplies. When we change insurers, I will immediatly order a three month supply rather than wait until his current supply runs out. This system will allow us to always have at least a two to three month supply of everything we will need. One never knows when shipping can be delayed or worse problems may arise. When a little child is dependent on life saving medicine in this day and age, we always need to be prepared!

  • We have about a months worth of strips on hand, at least a month of syringes/needles, and at least enough insulin for a month. Living in California, I worry about earthquakes in addition to the threat of war. Our daughter was diagnosed right after 9/11, and our doctor advised us at diagnosis to keep at least 2 weeks worth of all supplies on hand at all times in the event of terrorist activity that might prohibit us from getting to a pharmacy--or prohibit the pharmacy from receiving their supplies.

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Last Updated: Wednesday March 16, 2005 16:37:24
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