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Poll Results

 

If continuous glucose monitoring systems are available but are not reimbursed by insurance, would you use them?

 
     

I would pay out of pocket regardless of price if the product is accurate and FDA approved

 
 

38%

 

  205

 
     

I would pay out of pocket if the system cost is under $500 and the disposable costs are similar to what I pay now for test strips

 
 

18%

 

  97

 
     

I would pay out of pocket if the system cost is under $250 and the disposable costs are similar to what I pay now for test strips

 
 

9%

 

  48

 
     

I would want it but I cannot afford to pay until there is reimbursement

 
 

23%

 

  122

 
     

I can make do with my current meter and strips system - I don't need a continuous glucose monitor

 
 

4%

 

  26

 
     

I don't know

 
 

5%

 

  30

 


Total votes: 528

 

If continuous glucose monitoring systems are available but are not reimbursed by insurance, would you use them?

Poll dates: January 8 - 15, 2006
Total Votes: 528

Continuous glucose monitoring has the potential to revolutionize diabetes care. For the first time, patients will know before their blood sugar drops too low or rises too high and will be able to take action. Forgotten boluses will be noticed quickly as blood sugars rise faster than expected. And most importantly, parents (and adults and spouses) will be able to sleep through the night, knowing that the monitoring system will detect an impending low and sound and alarm.

For everyone who is eagerly awaiting the widespread availability of continuous glucose monitoring systems, one of the big unanswered questions is whether these systems will be affordable. Our poll focused on this affordability issue.

Two in five people report that they would pay out of pocket for a continuous glucose monitoring system if it is accurate. While we didn't explicitly define what "accurate" means, for parents it means sufficient accuracy for insulin dosing and a very reliable hypoglycemia alarm so we can get some sleep.

About one in five would be able to pay for a system out of pocket if it cost under $500. About one in ten could pay if under $250. Almost one in four would need insurance reimbursement.

Worth noting is that only four percent said they didn't need a continuous glucose monitoring system, illustrating the extent to which the visitors to CWD believe that these new systems will transform diabetes care.

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Last Updated: Sunday January 15, 2006 15:51:58
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