Back to Pumps Infusion Sets
Pump Contents

Insulin Pump Therapy

Why Good Control is Important

Pumps vs. Shots

Pump Basics

Using the Pump

Is the Pump Right for You?

Kids and Pumps

Life on the Pump

Wearing Your Pump

Pumps in School

Getting Started with the Pump

Infusion Sets

Related Products

Links and Resources

Infusion Sets

Insulin pumps deliver insulin to the body by a thin plastic tube ending in a soft plastic needle called a cannula, through which the insulin passes into your body. A small number of people choose to use steel cannulas rather than plastic ones, but the choice is yours. Together, this tubing and cannula are called an "infusion set."

You insert the cannula just under the skin, usually on the abdomen, thighs or buttocks, using an introducer needle. If your set has a plastic cannula, you then remove the introducer needle, leaving only the plastic cannula in place. Some infusion sets have mechanical devices that insert the needle automatically, but all can be inserted by hand. Automatic inserters make it easier for kids and people with limited dexterity to insert an infusion set, and can make the process somewhat less intimidating.

Infusion set needles, particularly those from sets that are inserted at an angle, are substantially larger than the needles on insulin syringes. It's important to realize that these needles can be intimidating to kids, and also to first time pump users. It's also important to realize that inserting these large needles hurts for many people. Because of this potential for discomfort, use of a numbing cream such as L.M.X.4 or EMLA is highly recommended for all kids who use an insulin pump.

Click on the pictures in the table below to view information about the infusion sets available today.

Infusion Set Home Select an Infusion Set
Teflon Cannula, Angled Teflon Cannula, Straight Needle Sets
Inset 30
inset™ 30
Comfort, Silhouette and Tender
Cleo® 90
Orbit 90
Orbit 90
Sof-set QR®
Rapid or Contact
Classic or Polyfin

For More Information

back next

  Home Return to Top

Last Updated: Monday July 29, 2013 09:51:06
This Internet site provides information of a general nature and is designed for educational purposes only. If you have any concerns about your own health or the health of your child, you should always consult with a physician or other health care professional.

This site is published by T-1 Today, Inc. (d/b/a Children with Diabetes), a 501c3 not-for-profit organization, which is responsible for its contents.
By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Legal Notice, and Privacy Policy.
© Children with Diabetes, Inc. 1995-2015. Comments and Feedback.