Back to Type 2 Why is Physical Activity Important in Managing Type2?

Why Is Physical Activity Important In Managing Type 2?

Physical activity is important in managing type 2 because of the connection between exercise and blood glucose levels. Exercise increases your body's sensitivity to insulin. So by helping your body respond better to insulin, insulin is used more efficiently and you need to make less (or take less) of it to keep your blood glucose levels down. In fact, exercising can keep your blood glucose levels down for hours after you stop exercising. In some cases, exercise can even reduce your need for medications to regulate blood glucose.

The recommended amount of moderate to vigorous exercise is one hour per day. It's a good idea to know your target blood glucose level and to monitor your levels before, during and after you exercise. Exercise can also reduce stress lower your blood pressure and cholesterol levels, and improve circulation, which reduces your risk for cardiovascular complications. Here are some things you can do to stay active:

For more information about being physically active, visit the Weight-Control Information Network (WIN) of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). WIN offers a number of publicationsthat address healthy eating and physical activity .

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Last Updated: Saturday April 20, 2013 13:31:34
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